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Carbon Monoxide Detectors in Adelaide

Carbon Monoxide Detectors in Adelaide

Why aren’t we aware of the silent killer? My first encounter with Carbon Monoxide (CO) alarms was while in the UK, and I noticed that almost every house had one fitted. Due to the cold winters there, various heating and hot water appliances are widely used and pose Carbon Monoxide poisoning risks. Considering our Adelaide winter is cold enough for the use of similar heating appliances why haven’t we adopted these detectors for our safety? Much in the same way we have mandatory requirements for smoke alarms and safety switches. As an Electrician in Adelaide and keeping up to date with regulation requirements to do with smoke detectors, I decided to do some investigating. I also asked friends, family and clients what they knew about Carbon Monoxide. Here’s a link to some of our Smoke Detector information http://www.adelaideelectric.com.au/smoke-alarms-part-1/ The information out there. As it turns out, there is information online and on state government websites that inform us of the dangers of CO and what we can do to prevent exposure. https://www.sa.gov.au/topics/energy-and-environment/using-electricity-and-gas-safely/carbon-monoxide Much like we do with fire danger and smoke detectors. However when I asked people directly about Carbon Monoxide and its dangers there was a lack of awareness, and more so there was a lack of knowledge it can exist in all our homes.  It seems the nature of Carbon Monoxide itself means it is often not considered when thinking of home safety. Fire can be seen, you can smell it, feel the heat of it. It’s destruction can be seen and we know it can injure or kill by way of suffocation or burns. On the...
What is Lumens, Watts, Kelvins on LED Lights?

What is Lumens, Watts, Kelvins on LED Lights?

What is Lumens, Watts, Kelvins on LED Lights? With the advent of LED lights, I’m often asked about the terminology found on packaging and light globes in regards to LED lighting. What do all those numbers and letters on the light globe or light fitting mean? A little more technical than my usual articles but hopefully it will help with choosing your light fitting or globe. I’ll highlight the three most useful terms to know; Lumens, Kelvins and Watts. Lumens (lm) Lumens is the total amount of visible light given off by the globe or light fitting. It is the brightness of the globe. Therefore the higher the lumens, the brighter the light. The lower the lumens, the dimmer the light. You will find this commonly printed on light fittings. Shown as a number ie 800lm (800 Lumens). While in the past we chose light fittings based on wattage, with LED’s we now select on Lumens, consequently it may take a little getting used to! As an example, the old common 60W light globe gave off about 800 Lumens. Kelvins (K) Kelvin is a number unit that is used to describe the colour temperature of a light. You may have heard of lights referred to as warm or cool. Lights in the 2700-3000K range are yellower and considered to be warm, sometimes called Warm White (WW). Warm lighting is often seen as soft and relaxing and used in bedrooms and living rooms. Lighting around the 4000K range is called Cool White (CW), the light colour being more blue/green and appearing brighter to the eye. This light type can be...
Switch Board Upgrade Adelaide

Switch Board Upgrade Adelaide

Switch Board Upgrade Adelaide An electrical switch board, sometimes called MSB (Main Switch Board), Fuse box, power box or power board controls the electrical supply to your house. Most importantly it should ensure any faults in wiring or appliances are stopped before injury or fire can occur. When this happens a circuit breaker ‘trips’, a fuse burns out or a safety switch (RCD) trips. Wiring faults occur for a number of reasons. Often rats and mice can chew through cables in a roof or under a house. Electrical cable can become degraded over long periods of time, especially if not protected.  Old cables such as cotton covered, vulcanized rubber (black insulation) or cable inside split conduit is notorious for faults and poses an extreme danger. In these cases, you want the safety equipment in your electrical switch board to do its job and prevent fire or injury. Sometimes the fault is human error. Such as cutting through an electrical cable, handling an appliance with wet hands or a faulty appliance. In these cases it is mandatory the circuit protection work, including the safety switch to prevent injury and possible loss of life. An increase in electrical demand may necessitate the need for an upgrade. Often old boards have undersized cabling supplying the circuit protection and even more worrying we find burned out bare wiring behind some of them! An upgraded switch board also poses some other benefits. Circuit breakers are much easier to reset than a rewirable fuse. With correct labelling of the switch board it makes the task even easier! Multiple safety switches rather than a single safety...
Electric Oven Not Working – Adelaide Check Guide

Electric Oven Not Working – Adelaide Check Guide

Electric Oven Not Working –  Adelaide Quick Check Guide Before calling out an electrician to repair your electric oven, I thought it would be a good idea to run through a couple of self help tips. This may save you some money and get the oven working again. Sometimes it is something simple and easily over looked. If you’ve tried these tips and still have no luck, then give us a call at Adelaide Electric. Has the circuit breaker tripped or fuse blown? If the oven isn’t heating, the fan, light and clock aren’t working there is a good chance that a circuit breaker has tripped or a fuse has blown. These are most commonly found in your switch board and labelled STOVE or RANGE. Try replacing the fuse with the correct type or resetting the circuit breaker. If it blows or trips again then there is a fault that needs to be checked and best to call an electrician. Do not repeatedly try to reset the fault as there could be a dangerous situation present that needs correct testing and repair. Some kitchens can have an isolator switch that turns power off to the oven. These can be a large isolator switch or a smaller one that looks like a light switch. It’s not something that we use very often and can completely forget that it is there! Make sure it is in the on position. Some electric ovens plug into a socket that is found in a cupboard or behind a draw next to or underneath the oven. Socket outlets can be accidentally turned off when taking...
Smoke Alarms in Rental Property SA

Smoke Alarms in Rental Property SA

Smoke Alarms and Legislative information for Landlords and Rental Properties   Smoke Alarms Smoke alarms are designed to alert the rental property tenants of a fire. There are two main types of smoke alarms, the ionisation and photoelectric smoke alarms. The photoelectric smoke alarm is recommended by the South Australian MFS. Research reveals that most homes and rental properties in Adelaide contain ionisation smoke alarms which do not give early enough warning in the case of a smouldering house fire. A smouldering fire is the most common type of house fire. The type of smoke alarm fitted can be checked by opening the smoke alarm as you normally would to reveal the battery compartment. It should be written on the label, however the easiest way to check is that all ionisation smoke alarms have a yellow and black radiation symbol. Photoelectric smoke alarms do not have this symbol, although the actual alarm itself looks the same. The best practice is to replace all ionisation smoke alarms with photoelectric alarms when they are due for replacement. Rental properties include the following; detached houses, row houses, town houses, villa units, sole occupancy units, some boarding houses, guest houses and hostels. Smoke Alarm Requirements Rental Property purchased before 1 February 1998 At a minimum a battery powered smoke alarm must be fitted. Rental property purchased on or after 1 February 1998 A mains powered smoke alarm OR A 10 year long life lithium battery smoke alarm must be fitted. This is required by Development Regulation 76B under the Development Act. Rental property built on or after 1 January 1995 A mains powered...