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Ceiling Fan how to fix wobbly fans

How to Fix a Wobbly Ceiling Fan Let me start off by saying a small amount of wobble is fine and most fans will show some signs of a wobble. However more pronounced wobble can appear to be a nuisance or something may be wrong with the fan. Here are a couple of reasons why a ceiling fan may wobble or vibrate; • Ceiling fan fixing screws are loose or wrong type • Incorrect mounting of ceiling fan or lack of fixing to structural member • Poor quality ceiling fan • Loose screws fixing blades to fan body • Warped or damaged blades • Blades out of alignment • Blades out of balance The most common issues are; blades which have been damaged or hit and cause the fan to become out of balance, poorly aligned blades or blades out of balance from new. Luckily there are a couple of checks and repairs you can attempt yourself. A note on checking loose fixings to ceiling. I noticed there’s a couple of informative articles that tell home owners to check the tightness of the ceiling fixing screws. While this is a relatively simple task it does involve removing the top bell cover which exposes the supply cable(s) and electrical terminations. Even as an electrician, when performing this task I would be isolating at the switch board and testing that the circuit is not live. Using tools and having body parts within touch reach of electrical supply is not a safe practice. Also keep in mind that even though the fan is not ‘on’ there can be live looped cables present....

Ceiling Fan Tips and Handy Hints

Ceiling Fan Tips and Handy Hints You might be looking at having a ceiling fan installed in your home or just unsure what to choose. Perhaps you’re looking at what possibilities exist or whether some fan installs can be performed. I’ve got a couple of easy tips to help you along the way to make a decision. As Adelaide weather warms up over summer ceiling fans will improve your comfort level and reduce reliance on air conditioning. Have a look at my blog Ceiling Fans to Save Energy Costs to see why! What are your ceiling fan options?   You can choose a Ceiling Fan only or a Fan with Lights (LED options available).   Control can be made by a wall controller or remote control.   Standard sizes are 122cm (48”) to suit bedrooms or 142cm (56”) to suit larger bedrooms and living areas.   The number of blades on a fan is more a choice of style rather than function.   They can be installed on sloped or raked ceilings.   Keep in mind there needs to be 2.1 meters from the floor to the bottom of the fan blades for safety.   Flat timber blade fans are quieter than metal blades, and well suited to bedrooms.   Metal blade fans tend to push more air around than timber blades.   Available in a range of colours, white or brushed silver being the most popular.   Can be installed outside under a pergola or verandah to keep you cool outside.   Replacing an old ceiling fan with a new modern fan is a cheap option. Thinking of...

Ceiling Fans to Save Energy Costs

Save Money and Electricity using Ceiling Fans While writing this blog I needed to look up how much we are paying for electricity in Adelaide. Imagine my surprise, even as an electrician, to find out we not only pay the most in Australia, but it’s also one of the highest in the world! No my intention isn’t to get you all hot under the collar, I’m going to help out by explaining why ceiling fans are such a good way to save money on Electricity in Adelaide, especially during the hot summer. Most of the ceiling fans I’ve installed use around 60-65 watts of power, about the same as a bedroom incandescent light globe. Calculated for Adelaide electricity prices that equates to approximately 2 cents an hour to run. That’s all good news and you’re going to read similar stories all over the internet, but let’s look at the best ways to actually save money and not spend more! I’d like to just add a quick comparison I’ve worked out to run your home air conditioner. An evaporative air conditioner can cost up to 40 cents an hour to run and almost $2 per hour for full house ducted reverse cycle. Here’s a couple of tips for correctly using a ceiling fan to save money As you know a ceiling fan does not actually cool the room down. It works by providing a breeze or airflow around the room. This breeze evaporates moisture on your body and in turn cools the body, using the body’s natural air conditioning system. On hot days and nights where an air conditioner needs...

Correct Smoke Detector Installation

Correct Installation of Your Smoke Detector In Part Two of this Blog we discussed the most common types of smoke detectors. In Part Three I’ll go through the correct installation and legislative requirements. In South Australia, legislation is in place to make smoke alarms compulsory for all Class 1 and 2 buildings. In simple terms this includes residential homes. Homeowners and landlords are required, by Regulation 76B under the Development Act, 1993, to install battery powered or hard-wired (230 volt mains powered) smoke alarms. Too often we find homeowners have complied with minimum requirements and that landlords have not met theirs, at which point we like to educate them! Homeowners and landlords are liable for a fine of up to $750 if a working smoke detector is not fitted. Since the 1st January 1995 all new homes have been required to have mains powered smoke alarms fitted. For buildings built prior to 1st January 1995 and if there was a change of ownership from 1st February 1998 onwards the new owner must install a smoke detector within 6 months. The smoke detector must be mains powered or a 10 year sealed non-replaceable permanently connected battery smoke detector. If there has been no change of ownership since the 1st of February 1998 and the building was built prior to the 1st January 1995 the minimum requirement is that smoke alarms should be fitted by 1st January 2000. Up until recently the Building Code of Australia (BCA) did not require the interconnection of multiple smoke alarms within a building, even though smoke alarms themselves had this functionality available. As of 1st...

Smoke Detector Alarms in Adelaide – Part 2

Smoke Detector Alarms in Adelaide – Part 2 Which Smoke Detector Is Right For Your Home Part One of this blog described the reasons for having a smoke detector and general upkeep. In Part Two, we discover the different types of detectors available and how they work. I’ll also go into some of the science behind why a house fire is so dangerous. There are two main types of smoke alarms, photoelectric and ionisation. Through research it has been revealed that photoelectric smoke alarms are more effective at detecting smouldering fires and fires that have started in areas that are not within close proximity to the alarm. An ionisation alarm is more effective detecting flaming fires. Within our houses it is possible for a smouldering and a flaming fire to occur. However the recommendation is still for photoelectric alarms to be installed in a house. For homes which already have ionisation alarms it is recommended that interconnected photoelectric alarms be added to the installation. When the ionisation alarms reach their 10 year expert they should be replaced with photoelectric alarms. Smoke Alarm Interconnection Smoke alarms are now able to be ‘interconnected’. This means smoke alarms positioned around the house have a cable separate to the mains supply cable connected to all of the alarms, providing an interconnection. The benefit of interconnected is that when one alarm detects smoke and activates, all of the alarms in the house will activate their warning sound. This is extremely important to help with early warning and especially assists in houses with children, double story or of a design that limits sound travel. Imagine...

Smoke Alarms – Part 1

Smoke Alarms in Adelaide – Part 1 A guide to smoke detectors and smoke alarms. Why do we need smoke alarms? The smoke from a house fire causes eye irritation and blurs vision. House fires also produce poisons in the smoke that cause disorientation, impaired perception and confusion. This combination of effects, reduce the ability for us to find an exit during a fire. A smoke alarm provides an early warning that is needed to save lives and reduce property damage. Here are some interesting facts; When asleep you lose your sense of smell. A small fire can grow to engulf a bedroom or small room in 4 minutes. There are approximately 11,000 house fires per year in Australia. Statistics regarding smoke detector checks from the 2015 Duracell Fire Safety Study: 93% are not undertaking monthly checks. 3 million people in Australia have never tested their smoke detectors. In South Australia there were 836 fires in 2014. There were also 2 avoidable deaths which could have been prevented with working and well maintained smoke alarms. Consider that most fire related deaths are the result of inhalation of poisonous and toxic gases produced during a house fire, and not direct contact with flame. You can see why it is then imperative to fit an early warning device; the smoke alarm or detector. Just as important is that we need to correctly maintain, check and know when replacement is due of all types of smoke alarms. Maintaining Your Smoke Detector Once a year, or if the battery warning beep sounds before, replace the battery with the correct type according to manufacturer...